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Bacterial Imaging Cluster

Head: Adriano O. Henriques, PhD.

 

The Bacterial Imaging Cluster (BIC) at ITQB is based on the experience, knowledge and expertise of research groups that are studying different aspects of the bacterial cell biology in order to define new anti-infective strategies against bacterial pathogens. The type of work that is possible at BIC (ITQB) includes, but is not restricted to the following examples: i) the analysis of bacterial cell shape and how it varies using culturing conditions, such as the presence of anti-bacterial agents, and upon genetic lesions; ii) the analysis of bacterial gene expression at the single cell and population levels, through the localization and quantification of the signal from fluorescent reporters or through the direct localization of mRNAs; iii) the study of protein sub-cellular localization during the bacterial cell cycle and differentiation processes; iv) the study of the dynamics of bacterial chromosome replication and segregation. BIC comprises light microscopy instrumentation that is optimized for imaging of fixed or live bacterial cells. It also includes a laser micropoint system coupled to a high-end camera, which allows fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments to be implemented. Appropriate filter combinations allow fluorescence resonance energy transfer (or FRET) applications. Image acquisition uses the Metamorph software suite and off-site licenses are available for image analysis and processing. Charges for external uses may be applied. BIC is located on the 5th floor of the ITQB main building.

 

Contacts:

Adriano O. Henriques, Microbial Development Group (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Mónica Serrano, Microbial Development (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Website: http://www.itqb.unl.pt/research/biology/

 

ITQB- Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier

Av. da República Estação Agronómica Nacional

2780-157 Oeiras, Portugal

 

Bacteria1r

Bacteria can be detected by the addition of fluorescent compounds capable of targeting specific structures present at their surface.

Green – Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria labeled with a fluorescent derivative of vancomycin bound to the recently translocated peptidoglycan precursor. Blue and Red – Staphylococcus aureus bacteria recognized by fluorescent derivatives of different host peptidoglycan receptors, due to their inability to produce wall-teichoic acids

 

Bacteria2

Different bacterial models are used by research groups associated with BIC at ITQB.

Bacteria can be visualized by phase microscopy (Left panel) or by fluorescent microscopy (Right panel), where bacteria are labeled with different fluorescent compounds. Green – Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria labeled with a fluorescent derivative of vancomycin bound to the recently translocated peptidoglycan precursor, Blue and Red – Staphylococcus aureus bacteria recognized by different fluorescent derivatives of a host peptidoglycan receptors, due to their inability to produce wall-teichoic acids. Bacillus subtilis bacteria are also present but can only be detected by phase microscopy as they are non-fluorescent.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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